Noble Dreams

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#1 Sun 11th Apr 2010 06:09 am

SW
Member
Registered: Thu 15th Jan 2009

Imaginal Perception

Imaginal Perception: A Window into the Unexplained

Posted on Saturday, July 15, 2006 (CDT) by Thoth

For a period of 18 months starting in 2002, I had a series of strange, almost mystical experiences with four beings that to all intents and purposes, came from another world. Words can never fully do justice to the experience however I’ll try to briefly outline events here for the purposes of this essay.

As someone who has always had a certain amount of interaction with both off world and earth based energies, I’m no stranger to supernatural experiences, but these three encounters were quite different from the run of the mill ‘shadow person’ type of visitor that many of us see.

In each case I was woken from my sleep to find four luminous blue beings that seemed to be made entirely of light, standing two on each side of me. The only way I can describe these beings is that they were ethereal; they weren’t physically there in the same way that you and I are there and yet nevertheless they were there!


Far from being alarmed by their presence, I was perfectly accepting of the situation at all times. These beings neither touched me nor spoke verbally, instead they left me with a profound sense of ‘knowing’ that they were from a place far away and that if I ever needed them I could ‘ask them’ to return. They seemed to use two distinct types of energy, the first one of which caused me to levitate me a foot or two above the place I had been resting. The second current of energy was a pulsating one, this energy was what they used to systematically ‘work on me’ although to this day I don’t know quite what they did other than whatever it was it seemed to activate a series of energy centres in my body.

To me, this was undoubtedly one of the most amazing experiences I’ve ever had in my life and although I was at a loss to explain it, it could in no way be dismissed as a dream or a product of an over active imagination as sceptics may be inclined to suggest. The longest of these sessions lasted around two and a half hours, and the shortest, which was the first, maybe half an hour. What’s interesting is that my level of awareness was such that I was able to watch a clock and therefore monitor the time as it happened. I was also able to differentiate between the types of energy being used and even stop the proceedings when I needed the bathroom and have it resume when I returned. The level of conscious interaction I experienced went far beyond that of lucid dreaming, this was very real.

After spending over two hours with me, they simply lowered me back onto the bed and faded away.

Besides the high degree of awareness that I had maintained throughout the experience there was a strange after effect that also suggests that these three experiences were more than just dreams. For the three days that followed I cannot begin to describe the feeling of complete connectedness to everything that I experienced. Whatever happened created a surreal combination of euphoria and elation, it established a connection between my mind, my body and my entire being that lasted for three full days before gradually fading.

But if this remarkable experience wasn’t a dream, and I’m convinced that it wasn’t, then what was it?

Imaginal Perception – The Real Twilight Zone

One possible explanation is that it was an example of what French esotericist Henri Corbin described as ‘Imaginal Perception’. Corbin’s theory, which at the time he related solely to the world of the mystic, was simple; that a third state exists between physical reality and our imagination. This state is every bit as corporeal as our physical environment and can have a measurable effect on us, which is just as real as anything we would experience in our normal world. Those who are able to directly experience this third state witness the fusion of the real world and the dream world. According to Corbin, this third reality is one that is effectively sculpted by our own belief systems, drawing on archetypal imagery and symbolism. He contends that what we experience in this state is not our imagination, nor is it representative of concrete reality; it is a unique middle ground that interacts with both realms while existing independently and affecting us as if it was part of the physical world.
http://www.thothweb.com/article3449.html

http://hermetic.com/bey/mundus_imaginalis.htm

For the world into which our witnesses have penetrated-we will meet two or three of those witnesses in the final section of this study-is a perfectly real world, more evident even and more coherent, in its own reality, than the real empirical world perceived by the senses. Its witnesses were afterward perfectly conscious that they had been "elsewhere"; they are not schizorphrenics. It is a matter of a world that is hidden in the act itself of sensory perception, and one that we must find under the apparent objective certainty of that kind of perception. That is why we positively cannot qualify it as imaginary, in the current sense in which the word is taken to mean unreal, nonexistent. Just as the Latin word origo has given us the derivative "original," I believe that the word imago can give us, along with imaginary, and by regular derivation, the term imaginal. We will thus have the imaginal world be intermediate between the sensory world and the intelligible world. When we encounter the Arabic term jism mithali to designate the "subtle body" that penetrates into the "eighth climate," or the "resurrection body," we will be able to translate it literally as imaginal body, but certainly not as imaginary body. Perhaps, then, we will have less difficulty in placing the figures who belong neither to "myth" nor to "history," and perhaps we will have a sort of password to the path to the "lost continent."

In order to embolden us on this path, we have to ask ourselves what constitutes our real, the real for us, so that if we leave it, would we have more than the imaginary, utopia? And what is the real for our traditional Eastern thinkers, so that they may have access to the "eighth climate," to Na-koja-Abad, by leaving the sensory place without leaving the real, or, rather, by having access precisely to the real? This presupposes a scale of being with many more degrees than ours. For let us make no mistake. It is not enough to concede that our predecessors, in the West, had a conception of the Imagination that was too rationalistic and too intellectualized. If we do not have available a cosmology whose schema can include, as does the one that belongs to our traditional philosophers, the plurality of universes in ascensional order, our Imagination will remain unbalanced, its recurrent conjunctions with the will to power will be an endless source of horrors. We will be continually searching for a new discipline of the Imagination, and we will have great difficulty in finding it as long as we persist in seeing in it only a certain way of keeping our distance with regard to what we call the real, and in order to exert an influence on that real. Now, that real appears to us as arbitrarily limited, as soon as we compare it to the real that our traditional theosophers have glimpsed, and that limitation degrades the reality itself. In addition, it is always the word fantasy that appears as an excuse: literary fantasy, for example, or preferably, in the taste and style of the day, social fantasy.

But it is impossible to avoid wondering whether the mundus imaginalis, in the proper meaning of the term, would of necessity be lost and leave room only for the imaginary if something like a secularization of the imaginal into the imaginary were not required for the fantastic, the horrible, the monstrous, the macabre, the miserable, and the absurd to triumph. On the other hand, the art and imagination of Islamic culture in its traditional form are characterized by the hieratic and the serious, by gravity, stylization, and meaning. Neither our utopias, nor our science fiction, nor the sinister "omega point"-nothing of that kind succeeds in leaving this world or attaining Na-koja-Abad. Those who have known the "eighth climate" have not invented utopias, nor is the ultimate thought of Shi'ism a social or political fantasy, but it is an eschatology, because it is an expectation which is, as such, a real Presence here and now in another world, and a testimony to that other world.


HOPE is the thing with feathers   
That perches in the soul,   
And sings the tune without the words,   
And never stops at all        Emily Dickinson

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#2 Sat 12th Jun 2010 06:12 am

SW
Member
Registered: Thu 15th Jan 2009

Re: Imaginal Perception

http://vimeo.com/9532613

The Most Basic Form of Mind Control is Repetition

"It's only a movie."


HOPE is the thing with feathers   
That perches in the soul,   
And sings the tune without the words,   
And never stops at all        Emily Dickinson

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#3 Mon 14th Jun 2010 06:22 am

SW
Member
Registered: Thu 15th Jan 2009

Re: Imaginal Perception



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wI388XoC … r_embedded

amazing photography of what happens in your brain when you think new thoughts. Change your biology, change the world, just think! storstark


HOPE is the thing with feathers   
That perches in the soul,   
And sings the tune without the words,   
And never stops at all        Emily Dickinson

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